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Thursday, March 10, 2016

Sirgiorgio Clardy: The Sociopath From Hell

     Sirgiorgio Clardy bounced from one foster home to another in Portland, Oregon because even as a kid no adult could handle him. In 2000, when he was thirteen, he attacked his foster dad with a baseball bat. Clardy also threatened and attacked teachers, school administrators, and classmates. He took brass knuckles to school and once tried to sexually assault a female student.

     By 2013, the 26-year-old Clardy had been convicted of twenty felonies that included crimes such as forcing young women to work as prostitutes, assault, and robbery. When police officers arrested him, he'd threaten to rape their wives and children. When he wasn't incarcerated, Clardy made everyone who come into contact with him miserable, including the teenaged girls he forced into prostitution. This brutal pimp had no business living outside of prison walls.

     In the summer of 2012, several 18-year-old prostitutes, against their will, were doing business for Clardy out of the Inn at the Convention Center, a motel on the edge of downtown Portland. During the course of that operation a john tried to leave the motel without paying one of Clardy's prostitutes. Clardy caught the john before he left the motel. The pimp knocked the free-loader down and used his feet to stomp the man's face. As the seriously injured john lay bleeding on the ground, Clardy took all the cash he possessed. It took plastic surgery to repair the damage to the prostitution patron's face.

     Police officers arrested Clardy shortly after the assault. A Multnomah County prosecutor charged the violent pimp with compelling prostitution, first-degree robbery, and second-degree assault. The suspected pleaded not guilty to all charges.

     In the months leading up to Clardy's trial he threatened and spit on several lawyers appointed to represent him. Eventually Judge Kelly Skye, realizing that no lawyer wanted to be near this man, declared that he would have to defend himself with the help of a legal advisor who would not be required to sit next to him in court. After awhile even the legal advisor asked the judge to be relieved from the unsavory assignment.

     In July 2013, not long after Clardy's trial got underway in Portland's Multnomah County Circuit Court, the defendant spit on sheriff's deputies and threatened the judge. The next day, deputies rolled the defendant into court handcuffed to a wheelchair. To keep him from spitting on people, the deputies had covered Clardy's head in a mesh bag. Because Clardy refused to get dressed for trial, officers had wrapped him in a suicide smock.

     A few days into the trial, notwithstanding the presence of nine deputy sheriffs, Judge Skye ordered the defendant into another courtroom where he'd watch the proceedings on a video monitor. The judge considered Clardy too disruptive to be physically present at his own trial.

     The jurors concluded Clardy's two-week trial by finding him guilty of all charges. At the sentencing hearing a few days later, the prosecutor put Dr. Frank Colistro on the stand. The psychologist, in practice for thirty years, said, "I've evaluated serial murderers, serial rapists, and I'm going to tell you very few of those people reached the evaluation scores we're going to talk about here."

     According to the forensic psychologist, Clardy was in the 100th percentile of the narcissistic psychopath scale. "People like Mr. Clardy," the doctor said, "are born bad. It's not something we can fix. That's why we have prisons."

     The prosecutor had put Dr. Colistro on the stand to counter the defendant's claim that he heard voices and wanted to kill himself. Dr. Colistro testified that Clardy exemplified the textbook case of an anti-social psychopath, a man who thought he was smarter, more attractive, and better than anyone else.  According to Dr. Colistro, Sirgiorgio Clardy was not mentally ill. This man was evil.

     Judge Judy Skye, based upon Sirgiorio Claudy's violent past, criminal record, courtroom behavior, and psychological evaluation, declared him a "dangerous offender". People so designated, if given the chance, would offend again. As someone beyond the reach of rehabilitation, Judge Skye sentenced Clardy to 100 years in prison with no chance of parole until he served 36 years. Clardy, upon hearing his sentence, swore at the judge and threatened the deputy sheriffs.

     In January 2014, from his cell at the Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution, Clardy, through a handwritten, three-page complaint, filed a $100 million civil suit against, among others, Phil Knight, the chairman of the Nike Company. Clardy based his tort claim on the theory that Nike, on each shoe, does not provide a label that warns users that stomping a person's face while wearing this Nike product could cause serious injury to the stomped person. As a result of the defendant's omission, the plaintiff experienced "great mental suffering".

     Clardy's lawsuit, the product of sociopathy in the extreme, was dismissed by a judge on October 2, 2014. 

3 comments:

  1. He sounds like Hanibal Lector, from "Silence of the Lambs." This man is truly scary. I actually feel sorry for anyone who ever came in contact with him. If I was married to any of the law enforcement personnel involved in that case, I would be waking up at night in a cold sweat.

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  2. I met him a few times when we were just teenagers. Strangely, he was nice, and even protected me from a few girls who bullied me after school. I thought about taking him to prom, but he sort of disappeared. Then I never heard from him, or heard anything about him until this. It really saddens my soul. My prayers go out to him.

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  3. I was pregnant by him and he held a gun to my head and told me if I didn't get an abortion he would kill me and the baby when I first met him he was amazing that's how he gets you to your lowest poin

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