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Monday, June 24, 2013

James "Whitey" Bulger And His Mob Hit Man John Martorano

     James "Whitey" Bulger, the Boston area mobster and head of the Winter Hill Gang, went into hiding in 1995 after rogue FBI agent John Connolly tipped him off about an upcoming federal indictment. For years Bulger had avoided arrest by informing on other gangsters to the FBI. (Agent John Connolly is serving a life sentence for his longterm involvement with Bulger and his murderous gang.)

     In June 2011, FBI agents arrested Bulger in Santa Monica, California where he had lived 16 years in an apartment complex with his longtime girlfriend, Catherine Greg. The fugitive and his companion had been living under the names Charlie and Carol Gasko. He was in his 80s.

     Bulger is currently being federally tried in Boston on 32 counts of murder, homicides he either committed himself or ordered. John V. Martorano, a professional hit man allegedly employed by the accused murder for hire mastermind, is one of the prosecution's most important witnesses. In 2007, Martorano cut a deal with the government to testify against the infamous Boston mobster. Since then, after confessing to twenty murders, Martorano has been a free man. Three of the hit man's victims were innocent bystanders, including a man Martorano mistakenly shot because he was driving a car similar to the intended target's vehicle. (Even so-called "professional" hit men are notoriously incompetent.) After carrying out one of his contract murders, Martorano would summon mob underlings to dispose of the body. Most of his victims were buried.

     On June 18, 2013, Bulger's attorney, Henry Brennan, during his cross-examination of the 72-year-old witness, asked Martorano if he considered himself a serial killer. "No," the witness replied. "Serial killers kill until they get caught or stop. I confessed my murders. (Wow, good for you!) Serial killers kill for fun. They like it. I never liked it. I never had any joy." (Poor man, it's rough being a contract killer.)

     "No satisfaction?" the defense attorney asked.

     "None." Later in his testimony, Martorano insisted that he was a "nice guy." Moreover, he never thought of himself as a hit man or professional killer. "I didn't enjoy killing anybody," he said. "I enjoyed helping a friend if I could."

     "Does that make you a vigilante--like Batman?" Attorney Brennan asked in a sarcastic tone of voice. Later in the cross examination, the defense lawyer asked this prosecution witness to describe how he felt about murdering three innocent bystanders.

     "I did feel bad. I still feel bad. It was the worst thing I did."

     Mr. Martorano's testimony gives us a rare peek into the mind of a mobbed-up contract killer. Only a cold-blooded sociopath could, with a straight face, portray himself as a nice guy and a victim. This hit man wants us to believe that he didn't like killing people for money, that he did it to help others. What a guy. What a nice guy. Give me a break. 

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