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Friday, February 1, 2013

Texas Prosecutor Mark Hasse Assassinated Near Kaufman County Court House

     Mark Hasse graduated from Southern Methodist University Law School in 1981. In 1988, as an assistant prosecutor in the Dallas County, Texas District Attorney's Office, he became a certified police officer which gave him the right to carry a concealed firearm. In Dallas, Hasse was in charge of the D.A.'s organized crime unit. He was also president of the Dallas Chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

     In July 2010, Mark Hasse moved to Kaufman, a northeast Texas town of 6,700 35 miles southeast of Dallas where he joined the Kaufman County District Attorney's Office as the lead felony prosecutor.

     Just before nine in the morning of Thursday, January 31, 2013, two men ambushed the 57-year-old prosecutor as he got out of his car in a parking lot near the Kaufman Court House used by judges and prosecutors. The men, dressed in black and wearing ski-masks and bullet-proof vests, shot Hasse five times. Doctors at the nearby Texas Presbyterian Hospital pronounced him dead a short time later.

     Following the execution-style murder, witnesses saw two man in a late model silver Ford Taurus speed from the scene. In a search for suspects, homicide investigators began combing through the prosecutor's caseload. One of Hasse's 400 case ssignments involved a probe of Aryan Brotherhood activities.

     The authorities have posted a $20,000 reward leading to the identification and arrest of the prosecutor's assassins. In all probability homicide detectives are looking for a connection between the Ford Taurus and a member of the Aryan Brotherhood.

     At a Thursday January 31 press conference, Kaufman County District Attorney Mike McLelland said, "I hope the people who did this are watching, because we're very confident that we're going to pull you out of whatever hole you're in. We're going to bring you back and let the people of Kaufman County prosecute you to the fullest extent of the law."   

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